Documentary Review: ‘Ferrante Fever’

Greetings again from the darkness. “I publish to be read.” Those are the words of Elena Ferrante, an Italian writer who is committed to having her work speak for itself. She has eschewed the celebrity status that typically accompanies best-selling authors. Where previously we have been intrigued by recluses like JD Salinger, Harper Lee, or even Howard Hughes, it’s rare (unprecedented?) that we are speaking of absolute anonymity. With no public face whatsoever behind the pen name of so many successful books, director Giacomo Durzi flirts with the question, is it the mystery of the author or the author’s work that drives interest?

It’s somewhat ironic that a film focused on an author so adamant about avoiding the spotlight opens with a quote from one of the most recognizable names and voices on the planet. Hillary Clinton describes Ferrante’s writing as “hypnotic”, and claims to ration her time for reading the books. Of course when one chooses not to talk about their work, it leaves others to do so. Director Durzi serves up a lineup of editors and writers, plus a researcher/scholar and the translator of Ferrante’s all-Italian writing.

We learn that the fuse of globalization for Ms. Ferrante’s work was lit by James Wood and his review in “The New Yorker”. This global literary phenomenon exploded from there. Insight from writers Jonathan Franzen, Roberto Saviano, and Elizabeth Strout help us understand how these books have been so influential, impacting so many readers. A segment on the Italian Strega Prize for literature is fascinating, as it becomes clear that even her home country doesn’t know how to handle her success.
Translator Ann Goldstein is interviewed, and even jokes about how unusual it is for a translator to become part of the story … another example of how Ferrante’s anonymity changes things. Ms. Goldstein is unapologetically a fan of the work and seems anxious to continue. Ms. Ferrante’s own words drawn from her letters in “Frantumaglia” hover over the film as narration, but that’s as close as we get to the real person.

Time Magazine lists her as one of the 100 most influential personalities, which is kind of funny since we don’t know her personality other than through her writing. Durzi’s film is not a search for the person or a quest to uncover the author’s identity, as it’s more of an exploration of the popularity and impact of her work. We can’t help but wonder if other writers are more envious of her writing ability or of her ability to remain anonymous. Typically the former destroys any hope of the latter … but not with Ferrante.

David Ferguson

David Ferguson is a lifelong movie lover and passionate reviewer. He is also a husband, father, business owner, Longhorn, and baseball aficionado.

Twitter: @fergusontx

site: http://moviereviewsfromthedark.com/

Latest posts by David Ferguson (see all)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.