DIFF Documentary Review: ‘Most Likely To Succeed’ Opens Up Discussions About Our Education System

Greetings again from the darkness. When people discuss the U.S. public education system, most agree (at least to a certain degree) that it’s broken. The impassioned and creative debates occur over how best to “fix” it. The ideas are infinite, but as with any problem in need of a solution, it’s wise to consider the desired end result. What do we need and expect of our education system? And who is “we” in that question? Are we satisfying societal needs or those of the individual … and who decides?

It is not feasible to expect an 86 minute documentary to answer all of these questions and solve one of the biggest issues facing society, but skilled documentarian Greg Whiteley does his best to advance the conversation. “Teach to the test” is the widely accepted curriculum these days, and it’s defined as daily lessons and assignments structured to prepare each student for the standardized tests utilized for determining a student’s knowledge base, grading teacher effectiveness, ranking schools and school districts, and of course, determining the acceptability of certain students at particular colleges.

With a basic structure that has not changed in 124 years, it seems clear that our education system is not properly preparing students for a world that has changed drastically in the past 3 decades. Many make the argument that the future success of students will be determined by what are called “soft skills”: confidence, ability to collaborate, creativity, time management, critical thinking, and decision making. There are interviews from managers at Google and Khan Academy stressing that these are the skills they already seek in new hires.

There are defenders of the current system. They claim it’s all part of the game we play, and that students must survive the grind … just as their parents and their grandparents did. Opponents say students are being treated as data points, not people or future contributors. Whiteley takes us inside of High Tech High in San Diego. It’s an experimental campus committed to finding new ways to teach, so that students learn and retain and accomplish. One of their most impactful evaluation points come from group projects that are presented to faculty, parents and the community. It’s fascinating to watch the students work towards their goal, and equally interesting to hear the parents talk about personal growth of the students.

Whiteley includes the spot on quote from John Dewey: “If we teach today’s students as we taught yesterday’s, we rob them of tomorrow”. Though the film doesn’t touch on the highly charged political landscape or the importance of teacher education and preparation, it is quite effective in generating thought and discussion about what responsibility we have towards students, and how we can improve the odds that they will grow into contributing members of society. For more information on the film, or to schedule a screening at your school or organization, go to www.mltsfilm.org

David Ferguson

David Ferguson is a lifelong movie lover and passionate reviewer. He is also a husband, father, business owner, Longhorn, and baseball aficionado.

Twitter: @fergusontx

site: http://moviereviewsfromthedark.com/

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