Book Review: ‘Blue Eel’ Is A Satisfying Tale

blue eel rcc

Long suspected of guilt in his daughter Madeline’s disappearance, Branson Turaco finds himself pursued by a team of post-human assassins with glowing skin and a symbiotic relationship with a mysterious species of eel. Now he must decide how much he is willing to sacrifice in order to unravel the mystery of Madeline’s disappearance. What remains of a man once he sheds his humanity in the name of vengeance?

Branson Turaco works in the archives department in the local paper, where in the basement he copies old newspapers and throws away the ancient copies. He is called the Mortician by some of his colleagues and not spoken to by others. After five years, a man is arrested that had locks of hair from children in his trailer, which also included that of his daughter Madeline, the daughter he had been under suspicion of killing.

A detective Woost’s incomprehensible vendetta against him leaves you wondering about his sanity. Once he begins investigating the man who has just been arrested, he goes into action. Characters invented to help tell his story, include a filmmaker disgraced for the deaths of two children while on set, and a beautiful intern from the newspaper, desperate to find a place for her talents.

The world that author Lorne Dixon creates and the beings you meet, combined with the dregs of humanity, make for a very interesting journey as you explore the world of aliens, drugs, and unspeakable cruelty, but it is written so casually, you can’t help but wonder about the state of mind of the writer. It is a very good yarn and I enjoyed the genre it pursues and while parts of it were hard to accept, I found that once you decide to follow Branson Turaco on his trek, you are in it for the long haul. There are lots of twists and turns built in to keep you up at night and the ending, well, it’s all yours!

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Ann McDonald

Book / Movie Critic at Red Carpet Crash
Ann is originally from Dublin, Ireland and currently lives in Dallas, Texas. She was the secretary to the National Symphony Orchestra of Ireland for many years and is an avid book reader and reviewer.
Ann McDonald

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